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Ohio State Waterproofing
365 Highland Road Macedonia, Ohio 44056
Ohio City, OH 44056
US Phone: 330-467-1055
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING QUALIFIES AS AN ESSENTIAL BUSINESS - CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE INSPECTION (330) 467-1055

Wet Basement | Lakewood, OH

HomeWet Basement | Lakewood, OH

Wet Basement | Lakewood, OH | Ohio State WaterproofingFoundation, Crawl Space and Basement Waterproofing

Ohio State Waterproofing is the areas premier basement waterproofing, basement ventilation, crawl space waterproofing and foundation repair company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional. Ohio State Waterproofing provides services in and around the metro area, as well as Mentor. Contact Ohio State Waterproofing for a FREE consultation for your Wet Basements. Ohio State Waterproofing has provided quality service with over 80,000 successful waterproofing and foundation repair installations and satisfied customers since our inception in 1978. Ohio State Waterproofing’s philosophy for success is to provide honest, courteous and guaranteed service to every customer. Our reputation reflects this. Our well-trained waterproofing technicians are dedicated to complete customer satisfaction. This is achieved through fast, efficient processes as well as teamwork throughout this organization. You will always find a friendly representative willing to meet your needs at Ohio State Waterproofing. We are a full-service company that handles problems ranging from patching cracks to rebuilding basements. In addition, we hold three patents related to waterproofing that makes us unique in the industry. These patents and our experience allow us to be able to do what every other waterproofer can do, but no one else can do what we do.

Facts About Lakewood, OH

Lakewood is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States, on the southern coast of Lake Erie. Established in 1889, it is one of Cleveland’s historical streetcar suburbs and part of the Greater Cleveland Metropolitan Area. The population was 52,131 at the 2010 United States Census, making it the third largest city in Cuyahoga County, behind Cleveland and Parma. Lakewood is home to a young and diverse population, including a significant number of immigrants. Its population density is the highest of any city in Ohio and is roughly comparable to that of Washington, D.C.

Lakewood was incorporated as a village in 1889, and named for its lakefront location.

Earliest days

The wilderness west of the Cuyahoga River was delayed being settled due to a treaty the American government made with the Indians in 1785, whereby no white man was to settle on that land. Consequently, when Moses Cleaveland arrived in 1796, his activities were confined to the east side of the river.

The area now called Lakewood was populated by the Ottawa, Potawatomi, Chippewa, Wyandot, Munsee, Delaware and Shawnee tribes until the Treaty of Ft. Industry pushed them west in 1805.[8] The treaty, signed at Ft. Industry near what is now downtown Toledo, Ohio, ceded 500,000 acres of some of the tribes’ land to the United States for about $18,000 or 3.5 cents/acre. The Shawnee and Seneca, living with the Wyandot, were to get $1000 “…every year forever hereafter.”

The area now occupied by Lakewood, Rocky River, Fairview Park, and West Park was purchased from the Connecticut Land Company by a syndicate of six men headed by Judson Canfield on April 4, 1807, for $26,084.

In 1806 the area was formally surveyed as Rockport Township. In 1818, permanent settlement began with the arrival from Connecticut of James Nicholson. Other early pioneers included Jared Kirtland and Mars Wager. Settlements were mostly along Detroit Avenue, a toll road operated by the Rockport Plank Company from 1848 t0 1901, with large farms and properties extending north to Lake Erie. Making bricks and planting orchards were among the most prolific occupations until natural gas and oil wells were developed in the early 1880s.

By 1819 18 families lived in Rockport Township. In 1893, streetcars came to Lakewood with the construction of the Detroit Avenue line, followed by the Clifton Boulevard line in 1903 and the Madison Avenue line in 1916.

First government
Lakewood, the first suburb west of Cleveland on the shores of Lake Erie, began as Township 7, Range 14, of the Connecticut Western Reserve in 1805. It was a wooded wilderness through which cut the old Huron Post Road that ran from Buffalo, New York, to Detroit, Michigan. In 1819 a small group of eighteen families living in the area of present-day Lakewood, Rocky River, and part of Cleveland’s West Park neighborhood named the growing community Rockport Township. In April of that year, the first election took place in Rufus Wright’s tavern with a member of each household present. Three were elected as trustees: Henry Alger, Erastus Johnson, and Rufus Wright. Elected as overseers of the poor were James Nicholson and Samuel Dean. Henry Canfield was elected clerk. This type of government served Rockport for the next 70 years, with an election held each year.

In 1889 East Rockport, with 400 residents, separated from the township and became the Hamlet of Lakewood. Settlement accelerated rapidly, with Lakewood becoming a village with 3,500 residents in 1903. City status, with 12,000 residents, came just eight years later. By 1930 the population of Lakewood was 70,509.

Agriculture
The early settlers in Township 7 sustained their lives through farming. The land was ideal for fruit farming and many vineyards began to emerge. The fertile soil and lake climate that were ideal for producing crops is what attracted many people to move to the township. There was also vast amounts of trees to be used for building homes and other structures. The most common occupations in Lakewood were farming and the building trades.

First roads
Roads were the earliest influence on development in Lakewood. The Rockport Plank Road Company improved the old Detroit Road in 1848, opening a toll road from present-day West 25th Street in Cleveland to five miles west of the Rocky River. It continued operating as a toll road until 1901. A series of bridges spanning the Rocky River Valley, the first of which was built in 1821, improved commerce between Cleveland and the emerging communities to its west. An 1874 atlas of Cuyahoga County shows present-day main roads such as Detroit Avenue, Madison Avenue, Franklin Boulevard, Hilliard Road, Warren Road, and Riverside Drive.

 

WHERE TO FIND US:
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING

365 Highland Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
(330) 467-1055

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