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Ohio State Waterproofing
365 Highland Road Macedonia, Ohio 44056
Ohio City, OH 44056
US Phone: 330-467-1055
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING QUALIFIES AS AN ESSENTIAL BUSINESS - CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE INSPECTION (330) 467-1055

Wet Basement | Cleveland, OH

HomeWet Basement | Cleveland, OH

Wet Basement | Cleveland, OH | Ohio State WaterproofingFoundation, Crawl Space and Basement Waterproofing

Ohio State Waterproofing is the areas premier basement waterproofing, basement ventilation, crawl space waterproofing and foundation repair company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional. Ohio State Waterproofing provides services in and around the metro area, as well as Mentor. Contact Ohio State Waterproofing for a FREE consultation for your Wet Basements. Ohio State Waterproofing has provided quality service with over 80,000 successful waterproofing and foundation repair installations and satisfied customers since our inception in 1978. Ohio State Waterproofing’s philosophy for success is to provide honest, courteous and guaranteed service to every customer. Our reputation reflects this. Our well-trained waterproofing technicians are dedicated to complete customer satisfaction. This is achieved through fast, efficient processes as well as teamwork throughout this organization. You will always find a friendly representative willing to meet your needs at Ohio State Waterproofing. We are a full-service company that handles problems ranging from patching cracks to rebuilding basements. In addition, we hold three patents related to waterproofing that makes us unique in the industry. These patents and our experience allow us to be able to do what every other waterproofer can do, but no one else can do what we do.

Facts About Cleveland, OH

Cleveland, city, seat (1810) of Cuyahoga county, northeastern Ohio, U.S. It is a major St. Lawrence Seaway port on the southern shore of Lake Erie, at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. Greater Cleveland sprawls along the lake for about 100 miles (160 km) and runs more than 40 miles (65 km) inland, encompassing Cuyahoga, Lake, Geauga, and Medina counties and more than 70 suburban communities, including Lakewood, Parma, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights, East Cleveland, Euclid, Garfield Heights, and Rocky River.

Most of the city lies on a plain that rises 60 to 80 feet (18 to 25 metres) above the lake and is divided by the narrow valley of the Cuyahoga, locally known as the Flats. Lake Erie moderates the city’s climate, keeping temperatures generally cooler in summer and warmer in winter and occasionally causing heavy “lake effect” winter snows. Inc. city, 1836. Area city, 82 square miles (212 square km). Pop. (2000) 478,403; Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor Metro Area, 2,148,143; (2010) 396,815; Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor Metro Area, 2,077,240.

History
Erie Indians in the region were driven out by the Iroquois in the 17th century. The French established a trading post in the vicinity in the mid-18th century. In 1786, three years after the American Revolution, when the Ohio country was opened for settlement, Connecticut laid claim to a vast area of land (the Western Reserve) in northeastern Ohio. Moses Cleaveland, from the Connecticut Land Company, arrived with surveyors at the mouth of the Cuyahoga in July 1796 to map the area. He founded and laid out the town of Cleaveland. (In 1832 an a in Cleaveland was dropped to shorten a newspaper’s masthead.)

The city’s growth was slow until 1832, when the Ohio and Erie Canal (begun in 1825 to connect Lake Erie and the Ohio River) was completed. In the 1850s railroads increased the community’s commercial and industrial activity. When St. Marys Falls Canal (Soo Canal) between Lakes Superior and Huron was opened in 1855, Cleveland became Lake Erie’s transshipment point for lumber, copper and iron ore, and rail shipments of coal and farm produce. The American Civil War provided the initial stimulus for iron and steel processing, metals fabrication, oil refining (John D. Rockefeller founded Standard Oil there), and chemical manufacturing. Suburban trains were developed at the end of the 19th century. By the 1930s Cleveland had the appearance of a modern metropolis, with main roads converging on its Public Square, which was dominated by the 708-foot (216-metre) Terminal Tower. Rapid-transit lines now extend to Shaker Heights and East Cleveland (east) and to the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (southwest).

Cleveland’s economy, hard hit by the Great Depression of the 1930s, experienced renewed growth during World War II. However, the city’s industrial mainstays subsequently declined, a decline matched by a precipitous drop in population; in 2000 Cleveland’s population was only about half of what it had been in the peak year of 1950, when it reached 915,000. Tens of thousands (mainly those of European ancestry) moved to the suburbs, but many others left the area as jobs disappeared. Economic hardship especially affected the city’s large and less-mobile African American community, which by 2000 constituted more than half of the city’s population. In 1966 Cleveland’s Hough district was the scene of violent racial disorders. Municipal government faced mounting budgetary problems, capped by default on bank loans in the late 1970s. In addition, environmental pollution became severe, a condition infamously highlighted by a June 1969 fire on the Cuyahoga River caused by floating chemical wastes.

WHERE TO FIND US:
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING

365 Highland Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
(330) 467-1055

CALL OHIO STATE NOW!