Ohio State Waterproofing
365 Highland Road Macedonia, Ohio 44056
Ohio City, OH 44056
US Phone: 330-467-1055
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING QUALIFIES AS AN ESSENTIAL BUSINESS - CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE INSPECTION (330) 467-1055

Basement Ventilation | Parma, OH

Basement Ventilation | Parma, OH
Foundation, Crawl Space and Basement Waterproofing

Ohio State Waterproofing is the areas premier basement waterproofing, basement ventilation, crawl space waterproofing and foundation repair company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional. Ohio State Waterproofing provides services in and around the metro area, as well as Mentor. Contact Ohio State Waterproofing for a FREE consultation. Ohio State Waterproofing has provided quality service with over 80,000 successful waterproofing and foundation repair installations and satisfied customers since our inception in 1978. Ohio State Waterproofing’s philosophy for success is to provide honest, courteous and guaranteed service to every customer. Our reputation reflects this. Our well-trained waterproofing technicians are dedicated to complete customer satisfaction. This is achieved through fast, efficient processes as well as teamwork throughout this organization. You will always find a friendly representative willing to meet your needs at Ohio State Waterproofing. We are a full-service company that handles problems ranging from patching cracks to rebuilding basements. In addition, we hold three patents related to waterproofing that makes us unique in the industry. These patents and our experience allow us to be able to do what every other waterproofer can do, but no one else can do what we do.

Facts About Parma

In 1806, the area that would eventually become Parma and Parma Heights was originally surveyed by Abraham Tappan, a surveyor for the Connecticut Land Company, and was known as Township 6 – Range 13. This designation gave the town its first identity in the Western Reserve. Soon after, Township 6 – Range 13 was commonly referred to as “Greenbriar,” supposedly for the rambling bush that grew there. Benajah Fay, his wife Ruth Wilcox Fay, and their ten children, arrivals from Lewis County, New York, were the first settlers in 1816. It was then that Greenbriar, under a newly organized government seat under Brooklyn Township, began attending to its own governmental needs.

By 1850, the US census listed Parma Township’s population at 1,329. However, the rising population of the township had slowed over the decades. The Civil War affected Parma much as it did other towns and villages in the nation. Three out of four homes sent a father, sons, or sometimes both, to fight in the war. By 1910, the population of the township had increased to 1,631. In 1911, Parma Heights, due to the temperance mood of the day, separated itself from the Parma Township after by a vote of 42 to 32 and was incorporated as a village comprising 4.13 square miles. By 1920, the US census showed Parma Township had a population of just 2,345, but the following decade proved to be a time of significant growth and development for Parma. It was in the 1920s that Parma Township transformed from a farming community into a village. On December 15, 1924, Parma was incorporated as a village. The largest and fastest growing development of that time was H. A. Stahl’s Ridgewood Gardens development, which started in 1919, continued through the 1920s, and into the 1930s. A resident of Shaker Heights, Ohio’s first Garden City, H. A. Stahl developed Ridgewood as an ambitious “model village” project patterned along the lines of and rivaling the earlier Shaker Heights project with “churches, schools, motion picture theater, community house, and other features forming a part of all well-developed residence communities.” Ridgewood was designed and marketed as a Garden City on 1,000 acres of land to accommodate about 40,000 residents “325 feet above Lake Erie, in the healthiest section of the South Side, free from the smoke of industries, or the congestion and noises of sections nearer the Public Square.”

On January 1, 1931, Parma became a city with a population of 13,899. Whereas the incorporation of the village of Parma was met with much optimism, the newly established city of Parma faced the uncertainty of the Great Depression which had almost entirely stopped its growth. Money was scarce, tax income was limited, and some began to talk of annexation of both the city and school district to Cleveland. Both annexation issues, however, were soundly defeated as Parma voters overwhelmingly voted against them and silenced proponents of annexation. Not long after this, Parma was once again solvent due in large part to the newly created Gallagher Act and the determination of Parma’s Auditor, Sam Nowlin. By 1941, a building boom appeared to be underway in Parma just as the United States was about to enter World War II. After World War II, Parma once again began to experience tremendous growth as young families began moving from Cleveland into the suburbs. Between 1950 and 1960, Parma’s population soared from 28,897 to 82,845. By 1956, Parma was unchallenged as the fastest growing city in the United States. The population peaked in 1970 at 100,216. In 2016, Parma’s population had declined to 81,601, though it remains one of the Cleveland area’s top three destinations young adults (aged 22 to 34) are increasingly
choosing as a place to live, along with Lakewood and downtown Cleveland and in 2016 was recognized by Businessweek as one of the best places to raise kids in Ohio.

 


WHERE TO FIND US:
365 Highland Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
(330) 467-1055

 

 

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