Ohio State Waterproofing
365 Highland Road Macedonia, Ohio 44056
Ohio City, OH 44056
US Phone: 330-467-1055
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING QUALIFIES AS AN ESSENTIAL BUSINESS - CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE INSPECTION (330) 467-1055

Basement Ventilation | Ohio

Basement Ventilation | Ohio | Ohio State Waterproofing
Foundation, Crawl Space and Basement Waterproofing

Ohio State Waterproofing is the areas premier basement waterproofing, basement ventilation, crawl space waterproofing and foundation repair company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional. Ohio State Waterproofing provides services in and around the metro area, as well as Mentor. Contact Ohio State Waterproofing for a FREE consultation. Ohio State Waterproofing has provided quality service with over 80,000 successful waterproofing and foundation repair installations and satisfied customers since our inception in 1978. Ohio State Waterproofing’s philosophy for success is to provide honest, courteous and guaranteed service to every customer. Our reputation reflects this. Our well-trained waterproofing technicians are dedicated to complete customer satisfaction. This is achieved through fast, efficient processes as well as teamwork throughout this organization. You will always find a friendly representative willing to meet your needs at Ohio State Waterproofing. We are a full-service company that handles problems ranging from patching cracks to rebuilding basements. In addition, we hold three patents related to waterproofing that makes us unique in the industry. These patents and our experience allow us to be able to do what every other waterproofer can do, but no one else can do what we do.

Facts About Ohio

Ohio’s geographic location has proven to be an asset for economic growth and expansion. Because Ohio links the Northeast to the Midwest, much cargo and business traffic passes through its borders along its well-developed highways. Ohio has the nation’s 10th largest highway network and is within a one-day drive of 50% of North America’s population and 70% of North America’s manufacturing capacity. To the north, Lake Erie gives Ohio 312 miles (502 km) of coastline, which allows for numerous cargo ports. Ohio’s southern border is defined by the Ohio River (with the border being at the 1792 low-water mark on the north side of the river), and much of the northern border is defined by Lake Erie. Ohio’s neighbors are Pennsylvania to the east, Michigan to the northwest, Lake Erie to the north, Indiana to the west, Kentucky on the south, and West Virginia on the southeast. Ohio’s borders were defined by metes and bounds in the Enabling Act of 1802 as follows: Bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania line, on the south by the Ohio River, to the mouth of the Great Miami River, on the west by the line drawn due north from the mouth of the Great Miami aforesaid, and on the north by an east and west line drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, running east after intersecting the due north line aforesaid, from the mouth of the Great Miami until it shall intersect Lake Erie or the territorial line, and thence with the same through Lake Erie to the Pennsylvania line aforesaid. Ohio is bounded by the Ohio River, but nearly all of the river itself belongs to Kentucky and West Virginia. In 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court held that, based on the wording of the cessation of territory by Virginia (which at the time included what is now Kentucky and West Virginia), the boundary between Ohio and Kentucky (and, by implication, West Virginia) is the northern low-water mark of the river as it existed in 1792. Ohio has only that portion of the river between the river’s 1792 low-water mark and the present high-water mark. The border with Michigan has also changed, as a result of the Toledo War, to angle slightly northeast to the north shore of the mouth of the Maumee River.

The rugged southeastern quadrant of Ohio, stretching in an outward bow-like arc along the Ohio River from the West Virginia Panhandle to the outskirts of Cincinnati, forms a distinct socio-economic unit. Geologically similar to parts of West Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania, this area’s coal mining legacy, dependence on small pockets of old manufacturing establishments, and distinctive regional dialect set this section off from the rest of the state. In 1965 the United States Congress passed the Appalachian Regional Development Act, an attempt to “address the persistent poverty and growing economic despair of the Appalachian Region”. This act defines 29 Ohio counties as part of Appalachia. While 1/3 of Ohio’s landmass is part of the federally defined Appalachian region, only 12.8% of Ohioans live there (1.476 million people.) Significant rivers within the state include the Cuyahoga River, Great Miami River, Maumee River, Muskingum River, and Scioto River.

The rivers in the northern part of the state drain into the northern Atlantic Ocean via Lake Erie and the St. Lawrence River, and the rivers in the southern part of the state drain into the Gulf of Mexico via the Ohio River and then the Mississippi. The worst weather disaster in Ohio history occurred along the Great Miami River in 1913. Known as the Great Dayton Flood, the entire Miami River watershed flooded, including the downtown business district of Dayton. As a result, the Miami Conservancy District was created as the first major flood plain engineering project in Ohio and the United States. Grand Lake St. Marys in the west-central part of the state was constructed as a supply of water for canals in the canal-building era of 1820–1850. For many years this body of water, over 20 square miles (52 km2), was the largest artificial lake in the world. Ohio’s canal-building projects were not the economic fiasco that similar efforts were in other states. Some cities, such as Dayton, owe their industrial emergence to location on canals, and as late as 1910 interior canals carried much of the bulk freight of the state.

WHERE TO FIND US:
365 Highland Road
Macedonia, OH 44056
(330) 467-1055

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