Ohio State Waterproofing
365 Highland Road Macedonia, Ohio 44056
Ohio City, OH 44056
US Phone: 330-467-1055
OHIO STATE WATERPROOFING QUALIFIES AS AN ESSENTIAL BUSINESS - CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE INSPECTION (330) 467-1055

Basement Ventilation | Ohio

Foundation Repair | Ohio

Foundation, Crawl Space and Basement Waterproofing

Ohio State Waterproofing is the areas premier basement waterproofing, Basement Ventilation, crawl space waterproofing and foundation repair company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional. Ohio State Waterproofing provides services in and around the metro area, as well as Mentor. Contact Ohio State Waterproofing for a FREE consultation. Ohio State Waterproofing has provided quality service with over 80,000 successful waterproofing and foundation repair installations and satisfied customers since our inception in 1978. Ohio State Waterproofing’s philosophy for success is to provide honest, courteous and guaranteed service to every customer. Our reputation reflects this. Our well-trained waterproofing technicians are dedicated to complete customer satisfaction. This is achieved through fast, efficient processes as well as teamwork throughout this organization. You will always find a friendly representative willing to meet your needs at Ohio State Waterproofing. We are a full-service company that handles problems ranging from patching cracks to rebuilding basements. In addition, we hold three patents related to waterproofing that makes us unique in the industry. These patents and our experience allow us to be able to do what every other waterproofer can do, but no one else can do what we do.

Facts About Ohio

A fossil that dated between 11,727 and 11,424 B.C. indicated that Paleo-Indians hunted large animals, including Jefferson’s ground sloth, using stone tools. Later ancestors of Native Americans were known as the Archaic peoples. Sophisticated successive cultures such as the Adena, Hopewell and Fort Ancient, built monumental earthworks such as massive monuments, some of which have survived to the present. The Late Archaic period featured the development of focal subsistence economies and the regionalization of cultures. Regional cultures in Ohio include the Maple Creek Culture of southwestern Ohio, the Glacial Kame Culture of western Ohio (especially northwestern Ohio), and the Red Ochre and Old Copper cultures across much of northern Ohio. Flint Ridge, located in present-day Licking County, provided flint, an extremely important raw material and trade good. Objects made from Flint Ridge flint have been found as far east as the Atlantic coast, as far west as Kansas City, and as far south as Louisiana, demonstrating the wide network of prehistoric trading cultures.

About 800 BC, Late Archaic cultures were supplanted by the Adena culture. The Adenas were mound builders. Many of their thousands of mounds in Ohio have survived. Following the Adena culture was the Hopewell culture (c. 100 to c. 400 C.E.), which also built sophisticated mounds and earthworks, some of which survive at Hopewell and Newark Earthworks. They used their constructions as astronomical observatories and places of ritual celebration. The Fort Ancient culture also built mounds, including some effigy mounds. Researchers first considered the Serpent Mound in Adams County, Ohio to be an Adena mound. It is the largest effigy mound in the United States and one of Ohio’s best-known landmarks. Scholars believe it may have been a more recent work of Fort Ancient people. In Southern Ohio alone, archaeologists have pinpointed 10000 mounds used as burial sites and have excavated another 1000 earth-walled enclosures, including one enormous fortification with a circumference of about 3.5 miles, enclosing about 100 acres. We now know from a great variety of items found in the mound tombs – large ceremonial blades chipped from obsidian rock formations in Yellowstone National Park; embossed breast-plates, ornaments and weapons fashioned from copper nuggets from the Great Lakes region; decorative objects cut from sheets of mica from the southern Appalachians; conch shells from the Atlantic seaboard; and ornaments made from shark and alligator teeth and shells from the Gulf of Mexico – that the Mound Builders participated in a vast trading network that linked together hundreds of Native Americans across the continent. When modern Europeans began to arrive in North America, they traded with numerous Native American (also known as American Indian) tribes for furs in exchange for goods. When the Iroquois Confederacy depleted the beaver and other game in its territory in the New York region, they launched a war known as the Beaver Wars, destroying or scattering the contemporary inhabitants of the Tennessee region. During the Beaver Wars in the 1650s, the Iroquois nearly destroyed the Erie along the shore of Lake Erie. Thereafter, the Iroquois claimed Ohio and West Virginia lands as hunting grounds. For several decades, the land was nearly uninhabited.

WHERE TO FIND US:
365 Highland Road
Macedonia, OH 44056

(330) 467-1055

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